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Special glow-in-the-dark pumpkins grown for the first time – Brospar Daily News

Dusty Smith is the owner of Smith Farms in Powersville, Georgia and has been in the agricultural industry for 16 years with a particular interest in growing pumpkins. For the past four years, Smith has worked landscaping by day and commercial pumpkin planting by night. “I picked 100 every night, and by the end of the week there were 700,” Smith said. A two-time record holder for the weight and variety of Georgia pumpkins, Smith recently came up with an idea for something he says has never been done before. He created chemical concoctions to grow glow-in-the-dark pumpkins. “I have a fertilizer injector and all the chemicals I use are very expensive and runny,” Smith said. “That means you put it in a bucket and the fertilizer injector disconnects from the main line and that creates suction,” said Smith, who uses tape across each row of the pumpkin patch to feed. cultures. He said only certain varieties will accept the mix, while other squash will die. “I’ve spoken to plant pathologists, but no one has ever done so, so I’m excited,” Smith said. “When I feed them and water them, I mix chemicals and it drinks them and distributes them in the pumpkin.” During the day, sunlight or UV light can charge the pumpkin, Smith said. The glow-in-the-dark side of some pumpkins can be seen during the day using UV light. “It has to be 900 lumens or more, that’s why it charges, so the sun does,” Smith said. “You know, charge it all day and it’ll glow all night. Give him until 6 p.m. Smith said he wanted to try and find a way to grow glow-in-the-dark pumpkins, not just paint them, and challenge himself to create something he could be proud of as well. Smith said he plans for this season to open the farm to the public on September 16. Smith makes hay carts and buys pumpkins for the children, and offers the public the opportunity to tour the farm. Glowing pumpkin in the dark. By next year, Smith said, he hopes to have a full “haunted” pumpkin trail lined with glow-in-the-dark pumpkins for all to enjoy. For more information or to get involved and connect with the farm, please contact them here. Watch the video above for the full story.

Dusty Smith, owner of Smith Farms in Powersville, Georgia, has been in the farming business for 16 years and has a particular interest in growing pumpkins.

For the past four years, Smith has spent his time landscaping by day and planting commercial pumpkins by night.

“I pick 100 a night, and by the end of the week there are 700,” Smith said.

A two-time Georgia pumpkin variety and weight record holder, Smith recently had the idea of ​​doing something he says has never been done before. He created chemical concoctions to grow glow-in-the-dark pumpkins.

“I have a fertilizer injector and all the chemicals I use are very expensive and runny,” Smith said. “That means you put it in a bucket and the fertilizer sprayer comes off the main line and creates suction.”

Smith said he used duct tape to feed the crops in each row of the pumpkin patch. He said only certain varieties will accept the mix, while other squash will die.

“I’ve spoken to a few plant pathologists, but no one has ever been able to do this, so I’m excited,” Smith said. “When I feed them and water them, I mix chemicals and he drinks them and distributes them through the pumpkin.”

During the day, sunlight or UV light can recharge the pumpkin, Smith said. Use UV light during the day to see the shiny side of some pumpkins.

“It has to be 900 lumens or more, that’s why it charges, so the sun will,” Smith said. “You know, charge it all day and it’ll glow all night. Up to 18 hours of use.

Smith said he wanted to try and find a way to grow glow-in-the-dark pumpkins rather than just painting them, challenge himself to create something he could be proud of, and have what he calls the real deal.

Smith said he plans to open the farm to the public during the Sept. 16 season. Smith makes hay wagons and buys pumpkins for the kids, and gives the public a chance to see glow-in-the-dark pumpkins.

By next year, Smith said, he hopes to have a full “haunted” pumpkin trail lined with glow-in-the-dark pumpkins for everyone to enjoy.

For more information or participating farms, please contact them here.

Watch the video above for the full story.

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