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Two-thirds hail Truss’s bills bailout, but experts fear it could cost £100bn

Polls have also shown strong support for the government’s moratorium on the green levy scheme, which has driven up bills by around £150 a year.

Half (49%) said they would support this decision, with a quarter (21%) supporting it “strongly”.

Only 11% of respondents oppose the tax moratorium, and about one in five (22%) neither support nor oppose it.

The poll of 1,500 adults in the UK came a day before Ms Truss caused a stir by officially announcing her ‘energy price guarantee’.

No official figure was given for the cost of the scheme, but the Institute for Fiscal Studies said it ‘could easily cost upwards of £100billion in the next year alone’.

However, Ms Truss defended the move, citing ‘extraordinary times call for extraordinary measures’.

She believes the plan will bring certainty to energy bills, curb inflation and spur growth.

Tory MP Lee Anderson, who won Notts Ashfield’s iconic Red Wall seat in Labor in 2019, said the country was facing a ‘national emergency’ and Ms Truss’ decision would lead people to believe that you can pay fuel bills in the winter.

He described the rising costs as “astounding”, but said he hoped the announcement would give people “peace of mind”.

However, a senior Tory MP admitted: “I’m worried about the cost of this. It is enormous.”

“The free market was talked about throughout the leadership election, and the first thing we did was give something practical to the left of the Labor plan.”

“I understand the political urgency, but at the same time I think we are really struggling with public finances. Will people have to pay in the next few years?

“It looks like we’re going from one very expensive situation to another and I don’t know how much we can afford.”

Strong public support will be welcome in Downing Street. It followed attacks on politics from left and right.

The right-wing Institute of Economic Affairs – long considered one of the most influential think tanks on Conservative politics – described the deal as a “welfare for the middle class”. He predicts this will lead to “taxpayer subsidized spas in the future”.

Meanwhile, anti-poverty charity The Joseph Rowtree Foundation has warned low-income families will still face a ‘huge gap’ of around £800 between the rising cost of living and the support available .

Meanwhile, the Center for Policy Studies praised Ms Truss for defying pressure to impose windfall taxes on energy company profits and welcomed the end of a ban on fracking – a controversial method of drilling underground gas – as a step towards ending the UK’s opposition to reliance on volatile global markets.

In the latest sign that the Trus era is steadily progressing, Redfield and Wilton poll respondents poured cold water on the idea that former Prime Minister Boris Johnson could return to frontline politics.

When asked if he could make a political comeback, nearly six in 10 voters (58%) said no. Only 27% thought he could.

He described the rising costs as “astounding”, but said he hoped the announcement would give people “peace of mind”.

However, a senior Tory MP admitted: “I’m worried about the cost of this. It is enormous.”

“The free market was talked about throughout the leadership election, and the first thing we did was give something practical to the left of the Labor plan.

“I understand the political urgency, but at the same time I think we are really struggling with public finances. Will people have to pay in the next few years?

“It looks like we’re going from one very expensive situation to another and I don’t know how much we can afford.”

Strong public support will be welcome in Downing Street. It followed attacks on politics from left and right.

The right-wing Institute of Economic Affairs – long considered one of the most influential think tanks on Conservative politics – described the deal as a “boost for the well-being of the middle class”.

He predicts this will lead to “taxpayer subsidized spas in the future”.

Meanwhile, anti-poverty charity The Joseph Rowtree Foundation has warned low-income families will still face a ‘huge gap’ of around £800 between the rising cost of living and the support available .

Meanwhile, the Center for Policy Studies praised Ms Truss for defying pressure to impose windfall taxes on energy company profits and welcomed the end of a ban on fracking – a controversial method of drilling underground gas – as a step towards ending the UK’s opposition to reliance on volatile global markets.

In the latest sign that the Trus era is steadily progressing, Redfield and Wilton poll respondents poured cold water on the idea that former Prime Minister Boris Johnson could return to frontline politics.

When asked if he could make a political comeback, nearly six in 10 voters, 58%, said no. Only 27% thought he could.

The poll also found the UK remains strongly in favor of staying before the European Court of Human Rights despite widespread controversy in June when intervention by the European Convention on Human Rights led to the cancellation of flights scheduled to bring asylum seekers to Rwanda for processing. with under government flagship their application program.

Almost six in 10 (58%) said the UK should remain subject to the Strasbourg courts, with just 22% saying it should not.

Only 36% said the UK should be able to bypass the courts, with 42% opposed.

Likewise, few supported Britain’s withdrawal from the European Convention on Human Rights – the international agreement drafted after World War II and the basis of court rulings. Only 27% were in favor of stopping, while 33% opposed it.

During her leadership campaign, Ms Truss said she ‘will not bow to the European Convention on Human Rights and its continued efforts to control immigration policy’.

Former leadership candidate and ex-Attorney General Sue Braverman – whom Ms Truss appointed Home Secretary – has backed Britain by leaving the court’s jurisdiction.

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