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Veteran police officer, now a chef, remembers her time at ground zero 21 years ago – Brospar Daily News

Brattleboro Police Chief Norma Hardy remembers 9/11 like it was yesterday. She was a Port Authority officer at the time and lived in Brooklyn. She had no work scheduled that morning, but like everyone else, plans changed quickly. And then we started going to Manhattan,” Hardy said. When she arrived in lower Manhattan, the tower was in ruins. “I literally just walked out and it was a mess with people running around and it was awful,” she said. Carrying her With a police shield around her neck, Hardy walked block by block down the street she had been trying to protect for years. “I felt like I was in shock at that moment, witnessing what I was seeing,” she said. Moments later, a stranger brought her back to reality in front of her. Hardy and the other first responders began a rescue mission at Ground Zero. The most important sound was that of the fire alarm siren. “It was like we were in a tunnel,” Hardy said. “Because it’s like you can hear every sound because you’re trying to hear people screaming for help. You wanted to hear, we walk, people dig with their hands, pick up blocks with their hands. They are full of fires. “For days the search continued, with endless smoke and debris. “Your mind is deceiving you,” Hardy said. “So you think you can hear people?” And it really isn’t. It’s just that we’re so desperate to find someone. That’s what we think we hear. The Port Authority Police Department lost 37 officers that day alone. One of Hardy’s best friends, John Dennis Levy, 50, was one of them. Years later, they continued to lose officers to the disease they contracted out of thin air. “I have a lot of friends who are battling different cancers,” Hardy said. While some are still fighting their own battles against 9/11, some of Hardy’s young officers cannot understand that our country is under the sun. How the days have changed. “I spoke to some of my officers and they were kids when it happened,” she said. For Hardy, the story will never change. His memory is a reminder that those who were those who responded to the mission on that fateful day will always be remembered. In history,” she said.

Brattleboro Police Chief Norma Hardy remembers 9/11 like it was yesterday. She was a Port Authority officer at the time and lived in Brooklyn. She had no work scheduled that morning, but like everyone else, plans changed quickly.

“You know, as soon as we realized it wasn’t an accident, as soon as the second plane hit…we were mobilised. We started going to Manhattan,” Hardy said.

When she reached lower Manhattan, the tower was already in ruins.

“I got really into a mess with people running around and it was awful,” she said.

Wearing a police shield around her neck, Hardy walked block by block down the street she had protected for years.

“I feel like I was in shock and witnessed what I saw,” she said.

Moments later, a stranger brought her back to reality in front of her. Hardy and other first responders began a rescue mission at Ground Zero. The most prominent sound was that of the fireman’s siren.

“It was like we were in a tunnel,” Hardy said. “Because it’s like you can hear every sound because you’re trying to hear people screaming for help. You keep wanting to hear it, and we’re walking and people are digging with their hands, picking up blocks with their hands. They have fires everywhere.

For days the search continued, with smoke and debris pouring out.

“Your mind is deceiving you,” Hardy said. “So you think you can hear people?” And it really isn’t. It’s just that we’re so desperate for people. That’s what we think we hear.

On that day alone, the Port Authority Police Department lost 37 officers. One of Hardy’s best friends, John Dennis Levy, 50, is one of them. Years later they continued to lose officers to illnesses contracted from scratch.

“I have a lot of friends who are battling different cancers,” Hardy said.

While some are still fighting their battle against 9/11, some of Hardy’s young officers cannot fathom how our country has changed on that sunny day.

“I spoke to some of my officers and they were kids when it happened,” she said.

For Hardy, the story will never change. His memory is a reminder that those who answered the call of duty on that fateful day will always remember.

“If you don’t have anyone to tell you first-hand, I’m afraid it will get lost in history,” she said.

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