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Words you’ll hear during the Artemis I moon launch – Brospar Daily News

There’s nothing more exciting than watching a spacecraft take off from its launchpad and begin cosmic exploration than hearing some of the jargon used by Mission Control. For anyone who isn’t a NASA scientist or hobbyist astrophysicist, here are some terms you may have heard during the historic launch – and what they mean. Saturday. If the launch is “successful”, it means everything is on track. If it is “no”, the launch may be delayed. As mission teams enter their countdown, they will use phrases and shortcuts that may be unfamiliar to them. Expect to hear “SLS” to mean rocket, not Space Launch System, and “nominal” to mean things are normal or going as planned. When the rocket takes off with cryogenic (ultra-cold) liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen as fuel, the abbreviation for oxygen is “LO2” and the abbreviation for hydrogen is “LH2”. The Artemis launch team will likely refer to “ICPS”, which refers to the temporary cryogenic propulsion stage. After the two solid-fuel rocket boosters and the rocket’s middle stage, or backbone, separate from the spacecraft, the rocket’s upper stage will provide Orion with the necessary propulsion for space. The core stage of a rocket includes the engine, propellant tanks, and avionics or avionics systems. Video below: The team will be referencing “L minus” and “T minus” times during the countdown to building excitement for the launch of Artemis I on Space Coast. “L minus” is used to indicate the hours and minutes until liftoff, while “T minus” is for events included in the release countdown. If the release team announces a “pause,” this is a natural pause in the countdown, designed to allow tasks or the wait for a specific release window not to disrupt the schedule. . During the pause, the countdown and the T minus time should stop, while the L minus time will continue. After launch abbreviated after launch, the team may refer to the solid rocket booster as “SRB” and the launch abort system as “LAS”. Two of the three engines in the launch abort system can be used in the event of a malfunction during launch or return the Orion crew capsule safely to Earth in the event of a system failure. The third engine is used to jettison the launch abort system, which occurs shortly after launch if all goes well. Several “burns” that occur during the activation of the propulsion system can be mentioned after takeoff. The “perigee lift maneuver” will take place approximately 12 minutes after launch. This is when the ICPS burns up to raise Orion’s altitude so that it does not re-enter Earth’s atmosphere. Shortly after, there was the “translunar jet burn”, when the ICPS increased Orion’s speed from 17,500 mph to 22,600 mph to escape the pull of Earth’s gravity and depart for the moon. After burning, the ICPS will separate from Orion. At around 9:45 p.m. ET Saturday, Orion will perform its first “outbound trajectory correction burn” using the European Service Module, which provides power, propulsion and thermal control for the spacecraft. This maneuver will set Orion on his way to the moon. On its journey, Artemis 1 will venture further beyond the Moon than any spacecraft designed to carry humans. It is expected to spend 37 days in space, entering a distant retrograde orbit around the moon before crashing into the Pacific Ocean near San Diego on October 11. This is just the start of Project Artemis, which aims to bring humans back to the moon and possibly manned missions to Mars.

There’s nothing more exciting than watching a spacecraft blast off from its launch pad and begin cosmic exploration, as NASA’s Artemis 1 mission takes place on Saturday.

But if you’re a casual observer, there’s probably nothing more confusing than hearing some of the jargon used by Mission Control.

For anyone who isn’t a NASA scientist or hobbyist astrophysicist, here are some terms you’ll likely hear during the historic launch — and what they mean.

take-off term

NASA aims to launch Artemis 1 on Saturday. If the launch is “successful”, it means everything is on track. If it is “no”, the launch may be delayed.

As mission teams enter their countdown, they will use phrases and shortcuts that may be unfamiliar to them. Expect to hear “SLS” to mean rocket, not Space Launch System, and “nominal” to mean things are normal or going as planned.

When a rocket is loaded with cryogenic (ultra-cold) liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen for liftoff, the shortcut is “LO2” for oxygen and “LH2” for hydrogen.

The Artemis launch team will likely refer to “ICPS”, which refers to the temporary cryogenic propulsion stage. This upper part of the rocket will provide Orion with the propulsion it needs in space after the two solid-fuel rocket boosters and the rocket’s middle stage, or backbone, are separated from the spacecraft.

The core stage of a rocket includes the engine, propellant tanks, and avionics, or avionics.

Video below: Generating excitement for my Artemis launch on Space Coast

During the countdown, the team will refer to “L minus” and “T minus” times.

“L Minus” is used to indicate the take-off time in hours and minutes, while “T Minus” corresponds to the events included in the launch countdown.

If the release team declares a “pause”, it is a natural pause in the countdown, designed to allow tasks to run or to wait for a specific release window that does not interrupt the plan. During the hold period, the countdown and the T minus time are supposed to stop while the L minus time continues.

Post-release shortcut

After launch, the team will likely refer to the solid rocket booster as “SRB” and the launch abort system as “LAS”. Two of the three engines in the launch abort system can be used to safely return the Orion crew capsule to Earth in the event of a system malfunction or failure during launch. The third engine is used to jettison the launch abort system, which occurs shortly after launch if all goes well.

Several “burns” that occur during the activation of the propulsion system can be mentioned after takeoff.

The “perigee lift maneuver” will take place approximately 12 minutes after launch. At that time, the ICPS underwent a burn to raise Orion’s altitude so that it would not re-enter Earth’s atmosphere.

Shortly after, the “translunar jet burn”, when the ICPS increased Orion’s speed from 17,500 to 22,600 mph to escape Earth’s gravity and depart for the moon. After combustion, ICPS will separate from Orion.

At around 9:45 p.m. ET Saturday, Orion will perform its first “outbound trajectory correction burn” using the European Service Module, which provides power, propulsion and thermal control for the spacecraft. This maneuver will set Orion on his way to the moon.

During its journey, Artemis 1 will pass the Moon further than any spacecraft designed to carry people. It is expected to spend 37 days in space, entering a distant retrograde orbit around the moon before crashing into the Pacific Ocean near San Diego on October 11.

This is just the start of the Artemis program, which aims to return humans to the Moon and possibly a crewed mission to Mars.

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